Wilson Road Carpark #Terrigal open for ANZAC Day says Council #AnzacDay #parking @CCoastCouncil

Community Service Announcement

11/4/17

Council Opens Terrigal’s Wilson Road Carpark for ANZAC Day

Central Coast Council is undertaking a $2.3 million upgrade to improve the capacity of the Wilson Road car park at Terrigal.

This substantial project started in March 2017 and will include construction of an additional level, the installation of a lift within the carpark, CCTV cameras and the provision of additional disabled spaces on each floor.

The project will support continued growth within the Terrigal CBD, creating 110 extra parking spaces for residents and visitors to the area.

Council has now successfully negotiated a variation in the program for the additional (fourth) level of the carpark with the facility to now remain open until Wednesday 26 April, 2017.

Terrigal ANZAC Day Dawn Service a free shuttle bus will run from The Haven to The Esplanade from 4.30am to the Cenotaph for the service.

The existing level 3 of the carpark will remain closed, with levels 1 and 2 available for the community during the entire school holiday period.

In addition, Council has taken steps to reconfigure parking at The Haven to provide extra untimed spaces for those attending the Terrigal ANZAC Day Dawn Service along with the free shuttle bus running from The Haven to The Esplanade.

The change in the construction program, along with altered arrangements at The Haven will ensure that 500 parking spaces will be available for ANZAC day.

Council would like to thank North Construction and their associated contractors for their cooperation in delivering this essential infrastructure project.

ENDS


The Last Post

#anzacday #thelastpost #lestweforget

About The Last Post

In military tradition, the Last Post is the bugle call that signifies the end of the day’s activities. It is also sounded at military funerals to indicate that the soldier has gone to his final rest and at commemorative services such as Anzac Day and Remembrance Day.

The Last Post is one of a number of bugle calls in military tradition that mark the phases of the day. While Reveille signals the start of a soldier’s day, the Last Post signals its end.

The call is believed to have originally been part of a more elaborate routine, known in the British Army as “tattoo”, that began in the 17th century. In the evening, a duty officer had to do the rounds of his unit’s position, checking that the sentry posts were manned and rounding up the off-duty soldiers and packing them off to their beds or billets. The officer would be accompanied by one or more musicians. The “first post” was sounded when he started his rounds and, as the party went from post to post, a drum was played. The drum beats told off-duty soldiers it was time to rest; if the soldiers were in a town, the beats told them it was time to leave the pubs. (The word “tattoo” comes from the Dutch for “turn off the taps” of beer kegs; Americans call this “taps” or “drum taps”.) Another bugle call was sounded when the officer’s party completed its rounds, reaching the “last post” – this signalled that the night sentries were alert at their posts and gave one last warning to the other soldiers.

The Last Post was eventually incorporated into funeral and memorial services as a final farewell, and symbolises the duty of the dead is over and they can rest in peace.

1941-10-02. NEAR HAMMANA. THE BATTALION BUGLER OF THE 27TH PLAYING THE LAST POST AT SUN-DOWN AS THE TROOPS DISAPPEAR OVER THE HILL ON THEIR WAY BACK TO CAMP. (NEGATIVE BY F. HURLEY).

END


Article published by Gaye Crispin, Editor, Coast Times News 

#coasttimesnews #communitynews #centralcoastnsw