Say “Happy Birthday” to Hugo The Giant Galápagos Tortoise Turning 65 Today! #austreptilepark #CentralCoast

Say "Happy Birthday" to Hugo The Giant Galápagos Tortoise Turning 65 Today! #austreptilepark #CentralCoast Gaye Crispin with Coast Times News

Hugo The Great Galápagos Tortoise Turns 65 Today!

Happy Birthday Hugo!

Hugo, the enormous Galapagos tortoise, who calls The Australian Reptile Park home, turns 65 today.

Attendees at Hugo’s birthday party today included a Burmese python, geese and koalas all enjoying celebrating this milestone, along with a special birthday cake made especially to suit Hugo’s diet. It was filled with lucerne hay, lettuce and vegetables, along a few hibiscus flowers and some apple.

Arriving at the Reptile Park as a 13-year-old in 1963 and now 65 years old, Hugo is only just approaching middle age for his species. Galapagos tortoises may reach a maximum shell length of over a metre and weigh up to 180 kg in weight.

The South American tortoises typically have a lifespan between 150 to 200 years.

Happy Birthday Hugo!

Say "Happy Birthday" to Hugo The Giant Galápagos Tortoise Turning 65 Today! #austreptilepark #CentralCoast Gaye Crispin with Coast Times New

Why not take the kids to The Australian Reptile Park these school holidays and say Happy Birthday to Hugo!

Say "Happy Birthday" to Hugo The Giant Galápagos Tortoise Turning 65 Today! #austreptilepark #CentralCoast Gaye Crispin with Coast Times New

Say "Happy Birthday" to Hugo The Giant Galápagos Tortoise Turning 65 Today! #austreptilepark #CentralCoast Gaye Crispin with Coast Times New

Come on out to The Australian Reptile Park and say Happy Birthday to Hugo! Did you know the Galápagos tortoise or Galápagos giant tortoise is the largest living species of tortoise and the 14th-heaviest living reptile on the planet.

 

Say "Happy Birthday" to Hugo The Giant Galápagos Tortoise Turning 65 Today! #austreptilepark #CentralCoast Gaye Crispin with Coast Times New

 

DID YOU KNOW?  Tortoises Don’t Swim

Tortoises live entirely above water, only wading into streams to clean themselves or to drink. In fact, they could easily drown in deep or swift current.

Their feet are hard, scaly, and nubby so it can crawl across sharp rocks and sand. Tortoises often have claws to dig burrows, which they occupy during hot, sunny weather or during sleep. Tortoises are mostly herbivorous, eating cacti, shrubs, and other plants that have a lot of moisture.

They rarely migrate.

Their shell forms a rounded dome, allowing the tortoise’s limbs and head to withdraw for protection.

Australian Reptile Park

Pacific Highway
Somersby NSW 2250

Get Directions

ph: 02 ­4340 1022
int: +612 ­4340 1022

Contact by Email

Article by Gaye Crispin, Coast Times News Founder and Publisher

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