Abbott Government Puts Family Violence Reform at Forefront #Dobell #CentralCoast

Family & Community

Abbott Government Puts Family Violence Reform at Forefront #Dobell #CentralCoast Coast Times News, Central Coast, Gaye Crispin

Mrs Karen McNamara MP, Federal Member for Dobell

Abbott Government Puts Family Violence at Forefront

by Gaye Crispin

11/9/15

Senator the Hon Michaelia Cash visited Dobell last week to speak at a Domestic Violence Fundraising Breakfast hosted at Mingara by Mrs Karen McNamara MP, Federal Member for Dobell.

Domestic Violence has been made a national priority and is now on the COAG agenda. That means action will be taken,” said Senator Cash

“2015 is the turning point to how we address family violence. Women and children in Australia deserve to be safe in their home, on the street, and online. And none of us are going to stop until we achieve it.

“That’s why the government has developed the national domestic violence order recognition scheme. Currently AVOs, DVOs and APVOs are only state recognised. Putting in place national online systems across states where systems talk to each other, where DVOs and AVOs can be called up anywhere in Australia, will assist in early intervention, particularly in situations where an escalation in violent behaviour is taking place,” Senator Cash said.

The Daisy App is another tool the government has put in place to assist women at risk. Statistics tell us 1 in 3 Australian women above age of 15 will experience physical violence, and 1 in 5 will experience sexual violence. Daisy is an app that connects women around Australia to services,” said Senator Cash. (More information on Daisy app below)

 

Abbott Government Puts Family Violence Reform at Forefront #Dobell #CentralCoast Coast Times News, Central Coast, Gaye Crispin

Senator the Hon Michaelia Cash speaking at Domestic Violence Fundraising Breakfast at Mingara, hosted by Karen McNamara MP, Member for Dobell

Abbott Government Puts Family Violence Reform at Forefront #Dobell #CentralCoast Coast Times News, Central Coast, Gaye Crispin

 

Senator Cash said, “Domestic violence must be stopped. And it must not be tolerated! One woman a week is killed in Australia due to domestic violence. So far this year, 62 women in Australia have died as a result of domestic violence.”

“That’s two a week – doubling the rate of domestic violence homicides. 2015 is the turning point to how we address family violence. Women and children in Australia deserve to be safe in their home on streets online and none of us are going to stop until we achieve it,” Senator Cash said.

Abbott Government Puts Family Violence Reform at Forefront #Dobell #CentralCoast Coast Times News, Central Coast, Gaye Crispin

Mrs Karen McNamara MP, Federal Member for Dobell. and Senator the Hon Michaelia Cash

“1 in 3 Australian women above age of 15 will experience physical violence, and 1 in 5 sexual violence,”  said Senator Cash.

Abbott Government Puts Family Violence Reform at Forefront #Dobell #CentralCoast Coast Times News, Central Coast, Gaye Crispin

“We aim to get the message into our primary schools. We know we must teach our children at an early age that girls are equal. And we must also teach why we should have, and need, respectful relationships,” Senator Cash said.

Abbott Government Puts Family Violence Reform at Forefront #Dobell #CentralCoast Coast Times News, Central Coast, Gaye Crispin

 

“Our Prime Minister has now put domestic violence on the COAG agenda. That means domestic violence now has national priority, which means action will be taken,” said Senator Cash.

Domestic Violence Fundraising Breakfast hosted by Karen McNamara MP at Mingara 11/9/15 Abbott Government Puts Family Violence Reform at Forefront #Dobell #CentralCoast Coast Times News, Central Coast, Gaye Crispin

Domestic Violence Fundraising Breakfast hosted by Karen McNamara MP at Mingara 11/9/15

 

 

Check Out The Daisy App Here

We asked Karen McNamara MP, “Who is Daisy?”

Violence against women is unacceptable. Daisy is an app that connects women around Australia to services.

Daisy can link you up with a service phone number, be used to search the internet for more information and let you know what to expect when contacting a service. Family members and friends can use Daisy to gather information and support a loved one’s decision making.

The Daisy App was developed with input from all State and Territory Governments and funded by the Australian Government – has been downloaded approximately 100 times each week since its launch in March. In total, there have been more than 2000 downloads nationally.

Mrs McNamara is pleased that the Daisy app has been updated and has new features including translated information across 28 language groups, text-to-voice functionality for women with a vision impairment (or low literacy) and an SMS function for women living in rural or remote areas.

“We need to make accessing support for women experiencing violence as easy as possible,” Mrs McNamara said.

“What Daisy gives you is options and choices – it will help connect you with options and make choices that suit you, not what people tell you to do. If a refuge is the help you want, you can access that information. If you want specialist support, that’s there too.”

Special features of Daisy include a ‘Get Help’ function that allows users to quickly call 000 and a ‘Quick Exit’ button to leave screens containing service information.

“The phone is often the thing that is kept the closest so to have all this information on an app is fantastic. It’s helpful and convenient and it will make connecting to the right organisations a lot easier.”

“To make accessing support as straightforward as possible, Daisy provides women with an easy-to use list of specialist sexual assault, domestic and family violence services in their state and local area,” said Mrs McNamara.

“Family and friends can also use Daisy to gather information to support a loved-one’s decision making.”

END


Can You Recognise Different Forms of Domestic Violence?

The level and impact of domestic violence between a perpetrator and their victim are broad and far-reaching. Some of the most common types of domestic violence that a person can experience include:

  • Physical Violence – behaviour such as punching, beating, slapping, shoving, and so-on that may or may not involve the use of weapons;
  • Sexual Violence – any unwanted sexual behaviours, including forced sexual contact, rape, forced sexual acts on the perpetrator or others that cause pain or humiliation;
  • Emotional Violence – actions that deliberately work to undermine your confidence – and humiliate, degrade and demean the individual. Emotional violence also extends to threatening comments made from the perpetrator to the victim;
  • Economical Violence – when you are unable to make independent decisions about your use of money, and your partner controls your access to, and use of, money;
  • Social Violence – when you are unable to make independent decisions about your own social life, and your partner controls and decides where you go, what you do, and who you choose to socialise with.

How to Legally Protect Yourself Against Domestic Violence: DVOs

If you have been in a domestic relationship, you can apply for a domestic violence orders to restrict the access of an abusive partner on yourself, and/or your child or children.

Apprehended Violence Orders

Apprehended violence orders are taken out by parties that have not been in a domestic relationship and want some form of protection from the Court in relation to violent or, harassing activities from other individuals.

Apprehended Domestic Violence Orders

Apprehended domestic violence orders offer protection from physical abuse, sexual abuse, psychological and or emotional abuse, harassing or intimidating behaviour.

Apprehended Personal Violence Orders

Apprehended personal violence orders are given by the Court if there is evidence to suggest that there is physical violence damage to property, harassment, intimidation, stalking or offensive behaviour.